Series 1

Silky oak

Silky Oak (Grevillea Robusta) comes from the rainforests of Queensland and New South Wales, and is the tallest of the grevilleas reaching 30 metres plus. It likes a sunny position, fertile, well-drained soils and plenty of room to grow. Silky oaks grow everywhere in Australia but are most commonly seen along the east coast. In cold districts, such as mountain gardens, these plants need shelter when young as they can be affected by cold and frost. [1]

*Please DO NOT plant Silky Oak South of Coffs Harbour, It is considered as a pest there!

You will need:

- Plastic punnets used by commercial nurseries

- Seedling mix

How to plant:

The punnets should be cleaned of any soil and then washed in a sterile solution; bleach, disinfectant or vinegar mixed with water at the recommended rate for sterilisation are all fine

Make sure the drainage holds are not so big that water drains too freely; the growing mix (and the tender little developing plant roots) will dry out too quickly.

Sown direct into pots; Seed should be pressed lightly into the mix and covered with a fine layer. Press the covering mix down lightly but firmly with your fingertips or any flat object with a knob or handle on top. 

Water lightly and keep moist (but never wet) with daily waterings (twice daily in very hot and dry weather). Don't let the growing mix dry out. 

Place trays in a warm, shaded, protected spot such as a shadehouse, garage, carport or part of a verandah. 

When the seedlings start to grow upwards and develop leaves, give them a light misting each day and prepare to pot them out.[2]

Crows Ash

Crows Ash (Flindersia Australis) is a large hardwood species native to parts of northern New South Wales and Queensland. It grows in the coastal rainforests from northern News South Wales to Gladstone in Queensland and can reach up to 40m in height.[3] Crows Ash requires a rich moist soil, full to part sun and will tolerate light frost.[4]

You will need:

- Plastic punnets used by commercial nurseries

- Seedling mix

How to plant:

The punnets should be cleaned of any soil and then washed in a sterile solution; bleach, disinfectant or vinegar mixed with water at the recommended rate for sterilisation are all fine

Make sure the drainage holds are not so big that water drains too freely; the growing mix (and the tender little developing plant roots) will dry out too quickly. 

Sown direct into pots; Seed should be pressed lightly into the mix and covered with a fine layer. Press the covering mix down lightly but firmly with your fingertips or any flat object with a knob or handle on top. 

Water lightly and keep moist (but never wet) with daily waterings (twice daily in very hot and dry weather). Don't let the growing mix dry out. 

Place trays in a warm, shaded, protected spot such as a shadehouse, garage, carport or part of a verandah. 

When the seedlings start to grow upwards and develop leaves, give them a light misting each day and prepare to pot them out.[2]

Series 2

Sydney Blue Gum

Sydney blue gum (Eucalyptus Saligna) is a large Australian hardwood (flowering) tree common along the New South Wales seaboard and into Queensland, which can reach a maximum of 65 metres in height.[5] It is suited to a wide range of soils yet grows best on well draining sandy gravel to loamy clays and alluvial flats. The species can tolerate light frosts, however will not grow well in areas of waterlogging, salinity or heavy clay.[6]

You will need:

- Flat tray or flat punnet

- Seedling mix

How to plant:

Flat tray should be cleaned of any soil and then washed in a sterile solution; bleach, disinfectant or vinegar mixed with water at the recommended rate for sterilisation are all fine

Make sure the drainage holds are not so big that water drains too freely; the growing mix (and the tender little developing plant roots) will dry out too quickly. 

Do not over-sow small seed in the trays or you’ll get a mass of weak seedlings.

Scattered seeds on top of a coarse medium such as peat or an orchid mix; cover with fine netting, shadecloth or any material which will protect the seeds from drying out but won't allow them to become too moist, particularly in humid weather. 

Water lightly and keep moist (but never wet) with daily waterings (twice daily in very hot and dry weather). Don't let the growing mix dry out. 

Place trays in a warm, shaded, protected spot such as a shadehouse, garage, carport or part of a verandah. 

When the seedlings start to grow upwards and develop leaves, give them a light misting each day and prepare to pot them out.[2]

Tuckeroo 

Tuckeroo’s (Cupaniopsis Anacardioides) range of natural distribution is from Seven Mile Beach, New South Wales to Queensland, northern Australia.[7] It is a very hardy native tree growing to a height of about 8 m by 5 m wide.[8] It is suited to wide range of soil conditions from sandy to free draining heavy loam and a wide range of light conditions from full sun to shade. It is also tolerant of coastal exposure and salt spray. For the best result plant in mulch soil to retain soil moisture.[9]

You will need:

- Plastic punnets used by commercial nurseries

- Seedling mix

How to plant:

The punnets should be cleaned of any soil and then washed in a sterile solution; bleach, disinfectant or vinegar mixed with water at the recommended rate for sterilisation are all fine

Make sure the drainage holds are not so big that water drains too freely; the growing mix (and the tender little developing plant roots) will dry out too quickly. [2]

Orientated the seed with their wider side down and with the aril end turned up, press the seed down into the seed raising mix to stop them from moving. Use standard seed raising mix with a pH balance of 6-6.5.

Preferably the seed will germinate quicker with a constant “bottom” temperature of 27 degrees Celsius. If you live in Queensland, the weather there is sufficient! Sow the seed as soon as you can for best result.[10]

Water lightly and keep moist (but never wet) with daily waterings (twice daily in very hot and dry weather). Don't let the growing mix dry out. 

Place trays in a warm, shaded, protected spot such as a shadehouse, garage, carport or part of a verandah. 

When the seedlings start to grow upwards and develop leaves, give them a light misting each day and prepare to pot them out.[2]

Series 3

Lemon-scented Gum

Lemon-Scented Gum (Eucalyptus Citridora) occurs naturally in northern Queensland from Atherton to Maryborough, but it is widely grown in many more temperate areas. It is a fast growing tree that could reach up to 20-30m in height. The tree announces its presence in a garden or street by the delicious lemon fragrance from the leaves. The perfume is particularly noticeable after rain. It enjoys full sun and well-drained soil. Protect from frost when young.[11]

Warning

Lemon-Scented Gum has a large root system and unlike Weeping Fig the roots cannot be controlled through regular pruning. It can crack footpaths and driveways and destabilise the foundations of houses, we do not recommend planting in suburban gardens.

We do not recommend planting weeping figs in suburban gardens. If you must plant a weeping fig, keep it at least 8-10m (25-30') from the house as well as a fair distance from footpaths and driveways. [12]

You will need:

- Flat tray or flat punnet

- Seedling mix

How to plant:

Flat tray should be cleaned of any soil and then washed in a sterile solution; bleach, disinfectant or vinegar mixed with water at the recommended rate for sterilisation are all fine

Make sure the drainage holds are not so big that water drains too freely; the growing mix (and the tender little developing plant roots) will dry out too quickly. 

Do not over-sow small seed in the trays or you’ll get a mass of weak seedlings.

Scattered seeds on top of a coarse medium such as peat or an orchid mix; cover with fine netting, shadecloth or any material which will protect the seeds from drying out but won't allow them to become too moist, particularly in humid weather. 

Water lightly and keep moist (but never wet) with daily waterings (twice daily in very hot and dry weather). Don't let the growing mix dry out. 

Place trays in a warm, shaded, protected spot such as a shadehouse, garage, carport or part of a verandah. 

When the seedlings start to grow upwards and develop leaves, give them a light misting each day and prepare to pot them out.[2]

Weeping Fig

Weeping Fig (Ficus Benjamina) is native to India, Southeast Asia, Southwest Pacific, and Northern Australia. If left to grow naturally, it reaches 12-15 m tall. Ficus do well in a well-drained, peat-based potting soil. Water regularly during the growing season but avoid overwatering, they don't like soil that is too dry or too moist. Reduce watering from autumn to late winter. Germination can take several months. It can be a more, don't give up.[13]

Warning

Weeping Fig’s are rainforest giants in their natural habitat. Please make sure you prune your tree regularly to keep it manageable. The root system of a weeping fig is extremely aggressive; it can crack footpaths and driveways and destabilise the foundations of houses.

We do not recommend planting weeping figs in suburban gardens. If you must plant a weeping fig, keep it at least 8-10m (25-30') from the house as well as a fair distance from footpaths and driveways. There is a bit of flexibility if the trees are rigidly pruned, thus restricting their root growth and spread.[12]

You will need:

- Flat tray or flat punnet

- Seedling mix

How to plant:

Flat tray should be cleaned of any soil and then washed in a sterile solution; bleach, disinfectant or vinegar mixed with water at the recommended rate for sterilisation are all fine

Make sure the drainage holds are not so big that water drains too freely; the growing mix (and the tender little developing plant roots) will dry out too quickly. 

Do not over-sow small seed in the trays or you’ll get a mass of weak seedlings.

Scattered seeds on top of a coarse medium such as peat or an orchid mix; cover with fine netting, shadecloth or any material which will protect the seeds from drying out but won't allow them to become too moist, particularly in humid weather. 

Water lightly and keep moist (but never wet) with daily waterings (twice daily in very hot and dry weather). Don't let the growing mix dry out. 

Place trays in a warm, shaded, protected spot such as a shadehouse, garage, carport or part of a verandah. 

When the seedlings start to grow upwards and develop leaves, give them a light misting each day and prepare to pot them out.[2]

 

Repotting seedling

When seedlings develop their second set of leaves (after the cotyledon leaves), prick them out and put them in a pot. 

Fill a 10cm deep pot with about 2/3 full with the growing mix. 

Remove seedling from the punnet/tray very gently, using a small spoon or narrow potting trowel - Try and keep as much soil as possible around the tiny, delicate roots that should be just starting to form at this stage. 

Place in prepared pot and fill up with mix, firming the plant in as you go. 

Water the mix until it is soaked through, Twice daily in very hot weather. 

The mix should remain damp between waterings but not soggy. Keep pots free of weeds.[2]

Seed storing

Store in a sealed, air-tight container in a cool, dry place. Humidity can encourage fungal diseases that destroy stored seeds. Short-stored seed (up to 6 months) can be kept in a paper or cloth bag, or envelope. Longer periods require a properly sealed, preferably glass, container at a temperature no higher than 25°C. When temperatures are high, store in the crisper section of a refrigerator or in an air-conditioned room. Keep insects at bay by including cloves, bay leaves, moth balls or similar deterrents in the bag or jar. [2]

Root Systems 

Please be aware that some trees have relatively large root systems, plan before you plant your trees. If you do not have room in your garden, consider guerrilla  planting your trees! (legally of course) 

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References

1. Burke's Backyard, 2012, Fact Sheet: Jacarandas and Other Monsoonal Deciduous Trees,
http://www.burkesbackyard.com.au/1999/archives/25/in_the_garden/trees_and_palms/jacarandas_and_other_monsoonal_deciduous_trees (Accessed 07/12/2012)

2. Tamborine Mountain Landcare, 2012, Tamborine Mountain Landcare Propagation Protocols, http://www.tamborinemtnlandcare.org.au/downloads/TMLpropagationprotocols.pdf (Accessed 07/12/2012)

3. Wood Solutions, 2011, Crow’s Ash; Flindersia Australis, http://www.woodsolutions.com.au/Wood-Species/crows-ash (Accessed 07/12/2012) 

4. Winter Hill Tree Farm, 2012, Tree Information - Crows Ash, Australian Teak, http://www.winterhill.com.au/treepage_range.php?tree_id=206 (Accessed 07/12/2012)

5. Wikipedia, 2012, Eucalyptus saligna, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eucalyptus_saligna (Accessed 07/12/2012)

6. Rob, C, 2004, Department of Agriculture: Farmnote - Sydney blue gum (Eucalyptus saligna) for sawlogs in the 450-650 mm rainfall zone, http://www.agric.wa.gov.au/objtwr/imported_assets/content/fcp/sc/tree/fn061_2004.pdf (Accessed 07/12/2012)

7. Wikipedia, 2012, Cupaniopsis anacardioides, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cupaniopsis_anacardioides (Accessed 07/12/2012)

8. Grow Me Instead, 2009, Tuckeroo, http://www.growmeinstead.com.au/plant/tuckeroo-nt.aspx (Accessed 07/12/2012)

9. Daleys Fruit Tree Nursery, 2006, Tuckeroo-Cupaniopsis-Anarcardioides, http://www.daleysfruit.com.au/plant/Tuckeroo-Cupaniopsis-Anarcardioides.htm (Accessed 07/12/2012)

10. Cock, R, 2012, Tuckeroo, http://www.greenstocknurseries.com.au/home (Accessed 07/12/2012)

11. Burke's Backyard, 2012, Factsheets: Lemon-Scented Gum, http://www.burkesbackyard.com.au/factsheets/Trees-and-Palms/Lemon-scented-Gum/2783 (Accessed 07/12/2012)

12. Burke's Backyard, 2012, Factsheets: Dangerous Roots, http://www.burkesbackyard.com.au/factsheets/Gardening-Tips-Books-Techniques-and-Tools/Dangerous-Roots/949 (Accessed 07/12/2012)

13. Australian Seed, 2011, Ficus Benjamina Weeping Fig, http://www.australianseed.com/product_info.php/pName/ficus-benjamina-weeping-fig/osCsid=2f6d960e908288fee5ead2177d830b3d (Accessed 07/12/2012)